Systems biology: Building better models

Our work lies at the intersection of diverse computational approaches including machine learning and mechanistic modeling, combined with translating new methods of assessing biology to systems approaches. Critically, this combination is synergistic; models in systems biology will always be only as good as the information used to assemble them, and as our understanding of biology begins to assemble from information about single proteins, we need quantitative models to understand and even communicate these complex processes.


News

Welcome, Dr. Bae, to the team!

Work from the lab is now out in Cancer Research.

Congrats to Ted and Annelien for winning Koch Institute travel awards!

The Meyer lab is looking to hire a postdoctoral associate, to develop and implement new strategies evaluating immune-tumor cell communication and targeted therapy resistance. Will help design and implement quantitative biochemical and phenotypic assays, analyze data, and interpret biological significance. Responsibilities will include communicating results to the scientific community through publications and presentations.

Requirements: A Ph.D. in biological sciences, computer science, engineering, physics, math, or related field. Must have experience in the following technical areas: computational methods and tools for analysis, and statistics; and biological experience in one of the following: molecular biology, immunology, or cancer biology. Strong analytical and problem-solving skills are highly valued. Seek a highly motivated, independent individual with excellent documentation skills; strong interpersonal skills; and the ability to contribute in a multidisciplinary team setting, prioritize and perform multiple tasks in a dynamic environment, and execute detailed technical protocols meticulously.

Research from the Meyer lab has been highlighed on NIH Director Collin's blog.

Aaron has received the Early Independence Award, a funding mechanism through the NIH Common Fund to allow recent doctoral graduates to rapidly transition to independent research careers.


Contact

Packages/Lab:

Meyer Lab
Koch Institute at MIT
Building 76, Room 387
500 Main Street
Cambridge, MA 02139

Mail/Office:

Aaron Meyer
Koch Institute at MIT
Building 76, Room 361F
500 Main Street
Cambridge, MA 02139
Phone: (617) 324-4404